A Riddle wrapped in an Enigmatist

Will Shortz, aside from having a name that makes me giggle for some reason, is a pretty bright guy.  It’s always fascinated me that someone can make a living and attain a certain modicum of fame by being the ‘editor’ of a crossword puzzle. I never really understood what that meant. I figured you either created it or solved it, I couldn’t grasp how one would ‘edit’ a puzzle. Now I get it… check out the article below.

  • Every crossword in the Times is a collaboration between the puzzle-maker and the puzzle editor. On average, about half the clues are mine. I may edit as few as five or ten percent of the clues, or as many as 95 percent for someone who does a great puzzle but not great clues. Why accept a puzzle when I’m going to edit 95 percent of the clues? Well, if someone sends me a great puzzle with an excellent theme and construction—you want fresh, interesting, familiar vocabulary throughout the grid—I feel it would be a shame to reject it on account of the clues, because I can always change them myself. … …

Read the whole article @ The Atlantic